About

Baltimore’s Civil Rights Heritage: Looking for Landmarks from the Movement is an ongoing project to research and document the historic context for the African American Civil Rights movement in Baltimore. We are writing a National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Documentation Form that documents the significance of the region’s Civil Rights history and supports the designation and preservation of local landmarks that tell the story of the movement.

Project Partners

Funding

The National Park Service Heritage Initiatives program awarded funding to the Maryland Historical Trust for this project in 2014 as part of a national effort to explore the ways in which the legacy of underrepresented groups can be recognized, preserved and interpreted for future generations.

In 2015, the Preservation Maryland Heritage Fund awarded funding to the Maryland Historical Trust for this project. Baltimore Heritage has also recieved project funding from the PNC Foundation in 2015 and 2016.

Questions?

What is the National Register of Historic Places?

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, it is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect our historic and archeological resources. The National Register is administered by the National Park Service under the Secretary of the Interior.

Learn more about the National Register program.

What is a Multiple Property Documentation Form?

The National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Documentation Form (NPS 10-900-b) nominate groups of related significant properties. Within the form, the themes, trends, and patterns of history shared by the properties are organized into historic contexts. Individual types of properties that represent those historic contexts are defined.

The Multiple Property Documentation Form is a cover document and not a nomination in its own right, but serves as a basis for evaluating the National Register eligibility of related properties.

Learn more about the Multiple Property Document Form.

What are examples of similar research projects?

Over the past decade or more, the National Park Service has accepted several Multiple Property Document Forms dedicated to documenting African-American historic resources, historically black neighborhoods, and the Civil Rights movement. These related MPD forms include:

Other communities have undertaken broader studies or surveys of African-American history and historic places. Examples of these studies include: